HIS 8245 - History of Policing in the United States

Overview

Description
Policing - both public and private efforts to exert control over places and people - has always been a contentious subject. This course will explore the history of policing in the United States, from the early years of the nation's existence to the present. It will consider many forms of policing, from slave patrols, to industrial policing, to private detectives, to the emergence and professionalization of federal, state, and local police forces. In so doing, the course will examine questions that have emerged historically from debates over policing, and how answers to those questions have changed over time. Who has the right to police whom, when, and why? How have ideas about and practices of policing defined the meaning of criminality and law, perpetrator and victim, and with what consequences? How does policing shape our understanding of such critical ideas as public safety, individual rights, and urban space? How has it reflected and defined shifting meanings of race, class, gender, and sexuality? What do the answers to these questions suggest about how we should understand the future of policing.
Typically Offered
Fall, Spring
Academic Career
Undergraduate Kingsborough CC

Credits

Minimum Units
3
Maximum Units
3
Academic Progress Units
3
Repeat For Credit
No

Components

Name
Lecture
Hours
0

Requisites

None

Course Schedule

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